Teach-in Sessions

PDF: Teach-In Sessions Schedule

Wednesday, March 25


Teach-in at 50: Vietnam, Citizen Action, Threats to Peace

Robert Ross (Sociology), Jerry Lembcke (Holy Cross) & Doug Little (History)
This panel will examine the origins and impacts of the original Teach-Ins at University of Michigan, 1965. The panel will explore an historical perspective on the teach-ins and why they happened (Robert Ross), the effects of the movements against the war and the Pentagon (Jerry Lembcke) and threats to peace today (Doug Little). Amy Richter, Director of the Higgins School of Humanities, will facilitate.

7 pm at the Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons.

Thursday, March 26

SESSION ONE  
9 – 10 AM


Global Warming Past, Present, and Future

JJohn-Baker-150 [www.imagesplitter.net]ohn Baker (Biology)

Global “warming” is nothing new.  It has happened repeatedly in the recent history of our planet, it definitely appears to be happening now, and it will undoubtedly happen in the future when the current episode of warming reverses.  The nay-sayers notwithstanding, if the earth is warming up as we think, only fools and liars (primarily people with something to gain from maintaining the status quo) can claim that humans are not the principal reason.  The precise consequences depend upon the extent of the warming, but include a variety of negative impacts to ecological systems and we humans who depend on them.  Malthus would have been quite at home in the modern world.

Higgins Intercultural Lounge (Dana Commons)


blattThe Facts Are Overwhelming, the Barriers Likewise

Les Blatt (Education & Physics)

The scientific case for fossil fuel usage as the main cause of global warming and world-wide climate change is solid; the economic, political, and ideological implications of these facts, however, are enormous.  We will review the science briefly, and then explore, in some detail, why denying the science has become the counter-argument of choice.

Geography Commons (Jefferson 220C)


Tim DownsA common core response to climate change

Tim Downs (IDCE)

How can diverse groups work together to assess, vision and plan for climate-change mitigation, and climate resilience? An integrated approach that combines mitigation, adaptation and resilience-building is called for, but how to do so in concert with diverse social actors is nontrivial. We will explore foundational work, and new work in the areas of capacity building, socio-technical transitions, and practical sustainable development. Efforts must be place-based and community-centered, but there are capacities and network approaches that may comprise a ‘common core’ response.

Lurie Conference Room (University Center)


This session will have two presentations at thirty minutes each:

Ronald EastmanClimate and vegetation 

Ronald Eastman (Geography)

How are vegetation seasons responding to the warming climate? Using remote sensing, a monthly time series of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) imagery from 1982-2011 is analyzed for trends in the seasonal response of vegetation to changing growing conditions. From the results it is evident that there has been a global net greening pattern, consistent with growing conditions enhanced by the warming climate.

Florencia Sangermano

Mapping the impact of climate change on biodiversity

Florencia Sangermano (Geography)

Climate and land cover change constitute serious threats to global biodiversity. I combine time series of remotely sensed data with global databases of species distribution, to identify locations of high impact of climate change on biodiversity. Results of this work inform conservation practitioners of areas under threat in order to facilitate conservation prioritization and in situ monitoring assessments.

Jefferson 218


deborahChanging oceans in changing times

Deb Robertson (Biology)

Ocean temperatures are rising as a consequence of climate change and increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are changing ocean chemistry.  This session will explore the impact of these human-caused changes on ocean life and ecosystem services.

 Higgins Lounge (Dana Commons)


thurlowToo many people

David Thurlow (Chemistry)

In 1972 the book Limits to Growth predicted, “If the present growth trends in world population, industrialization, pollution, food production, and resource depletion continue unchanged, the limits to growth on this planet will be reached sometime within the next one hundred years. The most probable result will be a rather sudden and uncontrollable decline in both population and industrial capacity.” How well have the predictions of the model described in this book held up, and is it time for world-wide population control? Does climate change simply make matters worse?

Fuller Conference Room (Goddard Library)


Chris WilliamsThe truth about climate change and pathways to a safe future

Chris Williams (Geography)

Global warming from the burning of fossil fuels is undeniable. We already feel the impacts and see them rising steeply into the future unless we take concerted action to transition to cleaner technologies. While the problem is clear and the technological solutions are ready, implementation remains wickedly elusive because of structural momentum as well as powerful economic and political forces that resist change. This session will expose the facts about climate change, challenge distortions asserted by denialists and special interests, identify key risks and vulnerabilities in the earth system, and discuss a path to a safer future.

Daniels Theater (Atwood Hall)

SESSION TWO  
1:45 am – 2:45 pm


How does Clark address this unprecedented issue?

President David Angel, Susi Moser, Christopher Uhl, Tony Bebbington, Sarah Buie & Chris Williams

A panel conversation with Clark’s President David Angel will include both of our plenary speakers, Susi Moser and Christopher Uhl (Penn State), Tony Bebbington (Director of Clark’s School of Geography), Sarah Buie (Senior Associate, Higgins School of Humanities and a Teach-in organizer) and Chris Williams (Geography faculty).

Tilton Hall (University Center)


Jess BaneSongs for the Earth

Jessica Bane Robert (English)

The poet and artist, brave enough to feel and see it all, have throughout history brought deeper awareness and change to society and its pressing issues. In this session, we will touch on some of the selected readings for the Clark teach-in day through a brief dialogue. We will also look at a couple of poems together before venturing outside to write our own verses for the earth.  This session will afford an opportunity to slow, cultivate the awareness of the poet and to attend to the world around us with senses fully engaged, in a state of reverence and awe for that which sustains us all. For how can we create change if we are not willing to look with our full attention and to enter into an intimate relationship with the earth, its’ gifts, and inhabitants?

The culmination of our time together and our writings will be exhibited in an installation housed on the second floor of Traina in the Art Lab.

Concurring with class ENG 101: Introduction to Creative Writing.

Jonas Clark 104 (1.45-2.45)


Nigel BrissettClimate change and the world’s poor

Nigel Brissett (IDCE)

Much of the popular discussion on the causes of and solutions to climate change often focuses on how the pursuit of wealth through industrialization subjects the Earth and its environs to unspeakable environmental practices.  Yet we frequently fail to engage with the significant and multiple ways in which the world’s poorest engage in and become more vulnerable to environmental degradation. My discussion will challenge the community to critically engage with global development initiatives that are supposedly aimed at addressing the unholy nexus of poverty and environmental degradation. What are the implications for the new global development initiative, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?

Higgins Intercultural Lounge (Dana Commons)


Halina BrownClimate Change is the wrong problem to focus on, recycling is the wrong solution

 Halina Brown (IDCE)

So you think that if half or more of our energy sources became renewable the ecological problems will be solved? Well, think again. What we really need is to start confronting the root causes of climate change and other ecological problems: the worship of economic growth and our consumption patterns.

Higgins Lounge (Dana Commons)


Cynthia CaronRethinking our Relationship with Nature: Native American Traditions and Beliefs

Cynthia Caron (IDCE)

We start this session with the music of Joanne Shenandoah of the Oneida Nation of New York.  After this music settles us in, we will watch two talks on climate change given by Native leaders including Oren Lyons, Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan of the Seneca Nation and  Cinnamon Spear, a Northern Cheyenne woman, writer and filmmaker.   Our discussion will explore the inter-generational thinking and logics of Native American traditions and beliefs and how they might inspire us to think about ways of being and facing the challenge of climate change.

Traina Center 002 (lower level)


Wes DeMarcoFriend of freedom? Enemy of nature? The role of capitalism in the climate crisis

Wes DeMarco (Philosophy)

Have capitalist institutions and practices contributed to the climate crisis?  To address the crisis adequately, do we need to better manage the current institutions and practices, ‘green them up,’ or try something different?  Are restrictions on economic processes limitations of freedom?  Is the ability to change, together, the rules of the socioeconomic game the expression of a form of freedom that is at least as important?

Rosenblatt Conference Room (University Center)


Gino-DiIorio-150Seeds of Doubt

Gino DiIorio (V&PA)

Gino DiIorio discusses his new play, dealing with activism and the environmental terrorism movement.

Experimental Theater (Little Center)


Anita FabosPopulation Displacement and Climate Change

Anita Häusermann Fábos (IDCE)

People are already seeing their home places and livelihoods transformed due to climate change. Moving to a different place is one way for people to adapt to precarious circumstances, but it raises different concerns for those asked to make room. What are the social, economic, cultural, and political practices that societies have for including–or excluding–newcomers? And what are our moral responsibilities to those displaced by our collective actions?

Fuller Conference Room (Goddard Library)


Jude FernandoPedagogy and social and environmental justice activism at Clark

Jude Fernando (IDCE) and students

This interactive student panel explores the reason for wide gap between classroom learning and active involvement of students in social and environmental justice activities.  Does the Clark prepare and provide students and generate enthusiasm to get involved in social and environmental justice issues? What obstacles do students face in this regard? How can we do to make learning more responsive?
Students presenters: Cori Baer, Elizabeth Crowther, Gabrielle Fricke, Nicole Hanson, Anne-Claire Merkle-Scotland, Caroline Santayana, Erin Wurtemberger, Raymond Zhang, and Khobrekar Vilas.

Jefferson 320


Barbara GoldoftasPublic Health and Climate Change

Barbara Goldoftas (IDCE)

What are the public-health consequences of a changing and unpredictable climate for different populations in different places around the world? Who could be affected, who has already been affected?

Prouty Conference Room (Goddard Library)


James McCarthyClimate change and the future of capitalism

James McCarthy (Geography) &
Kevin Surprise (Geography)

We will consider the ways in which capitalism – a socioeconomic system largely responsible for contemporary anthropogenic climate change – is responding to changing climates. We will consider whether climate change might present a serious challenge to the perpetuation of capitalism, or whether and how capitalism might actually thrive on the crises it creates, through new institutions and industries such as carbon markets, renewable energy, weather insurance, and geo-engineering. Finally, we will discuss alternative, more democratically-shaped responses to climate change.

Lurie Conference Room (University Center)


Hugh ManonEnjoying ourselves to death / Desire, prohibition and consumerism in the digital era

Hugh Manon (V&PA)

This discussion-based session will explicate, in easy-to-understand terms, the psychoanalytic account of human desire: how it is structured, why it’s a problem, and where (if at all) human enjoyment is possible.  The group will then investigate the shift from a mid-20th century “culture of prohibition” to our 21st century “culture of enjoyment,” focusing on concrete examples from past and contemporary media as a means of understanding how the shift from analog limitation to digital perfectibility creates a crisis of sustainability, in both material and psychological terms.


Paul PosnerThis Changes Everything

Paul Posner (Political Science)

A conversation on the relationship between capitalism and climate change, prompted by Naomi Klein, author of the recent best-selling book on the topic.

Traina Center 107


How Worcester and other cities are responding to climate change

Joe O’Brien (GSOM), Peggy Middaugh, Matt Feinstein & John O’Dell

This session will provide an overview of how American cities are responding to climate change, and efforts by US Conference of Mayors to make climate a priority for local government. It will include a panel discussion with Peggy Middaugh, Worcester Tree Initiative, on planting trees to address climate and community health issues; Matt Feinstein, Worcester Green Jobs Coalition, on creating jobs in energy conservation and renewable energy; and John O’Dell, City of Worcester Energy and Facilities Manager, on Worcester’s Climate Action plan and energy conservation efforts.

Jefferson 133


John RoganUrban climate and forest cooling in Worcester

John Rogan (Geography)

This session will examine the cooling effects of shade trees (oak, maple, linden, etc.) on urban climate in Worcester and the surrounding towns, specifically within the Asian Longhorned Beetle quarantine zone. This study is in collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.

IDCE Conference Room D


bethTaking care / Well-being and our climate future

Beth Sawin (Climate Interactive)

The urgency of climate change is growing within societies that face other problems including the need to overcome hunger and poverty, large and systemic inequities, public health challenges, and climate impacts that are already being felt. This session looks straight at the challenge of addressing climate change in the context of other struggles, and finds some unexpected, practical and hopeful opportunities in the process. A new framing of these intersections will be offered, as well as time to experiment with the new framework and share possibilities and visions.

Grace Conference Room (University Center)


Ed WeinbergerPutting a price tag on an uncertain future / A first step in climate change mitigation

Ed Weinberger (GSOM)

While there is near unanimous agreement about the science of climate change, there is sharp disagreement within the United States about what to actually do about it. Central to that discussion is the trade-off between the costs of future harm and the immediate costs of remediation. Estimates of remediation costs vary widely, but they could exceed 2% of current U.S. GDP per year.  Estimates of the most severe costs of global warming vary even more widely. While these costs are generally believed to be incurred a few generations from now, there is some chance of more immediate costs, due to the near-term climate catastrophes described in other teach-in sessions. Thus, the cost-benefit approach that policy makers tend to apply to situations like global warming requires a present value of these costs, including the contingent costs of climate catastrophes. I will present the economic thinking behind some of the best known of these present value calculations, after which I will open the floor for discussion.

Concurring with class FIN2508 Fixed Income Securities.

Carlson Hall 120 (1:25-2:40)

SESSION THREE
4:30 – 5:30 pm


James CordovaThe three Buddhist tenets / Not-knowing, bearing witness, and compassionate action

James Cordova (Psychology)

The climate is changing. The scale of the problem is overwhelming. We don’t know what to do. We want to turn away. It’s hard to know even where to begin and life is already so demanding. In this session, from the perspective of Zen practice, we will look deeply at the experience of not-knowing, bearing witness, and the natural arising of compassionate action. This session will include meditation and dharma talk, followed by a dialogue.

Higgins Lounge (Dana Commons)


David CorrellClimate change and supply chain management

David Correll (GSOM)

The products and services that we all consume daily have all been put together by long assemblages of independently acting people and companies that we call ‘supply chains’.  Historically, supply chains have been designed and managed to maximize value for their end customers. Today, however, many forward-looking thinkers are also designing and managing their supply chains with an eye on climate change.  We’ll take a big picture look at what this means in theory and in practice.

Higgins Intercultural Lounge (Dana Commons)


Tim DownsVisioning a more climate-resilient, sustainable future

Tim Downs (IDCE)

What would a more climate-resilient, “sustainable” future look like, how would we gauge success, and how do we get there from here? It’s a powerful question, one requiring bringing together social, cultural, economic, political and ecological impacts for a holistic frame of reference and monitoring. We will explore how key principles can inform a more comprehensive understanding of existing conditions – our ‘baseline’ – and, importantly and provocatively, will engage in visioning of a desirable future for Clark, Worcester and Central Mass Region for 2025 and 2050.

IDCE Conference Room D


Emel-colorfinalFood and climate change/ Justice from your plate to the planet

Jody Emel (Geography) & Dianne Rocheleau (Geography)

We will cover the potential effects of climate change on agriculture, the ways in which those agricultural changes will impact people, the considerations of justice that current social movements and scholarship foster, and the likely new issues that will arise.  We will consider food sovereignty, food security, local food politics, the Real Food Challenge at Clark, and other political.

Geography Commons (Jefferson 220C)


Jim GomesThe politics of climate change

Jim Gomes (Mosakowski Institute)

Stopping global warming will require the US to make major changes in its energy production and consumption practices, changes that are unlikely to happen unless the federal government acts forcefully. But can our polarized and gridlocked political system produce laws and policies that will dramatically reduce the U.S.’s greenhouse gas emissions?  Is there any way to bring about substantial cuts in America’s contribution to global warming other than changing the politics of the issue?

Fuller Conference Room (Goddard Library)


Jenny IslerClark’s Climate Action Plan / Are we serious?Rob Johnston

Jenny Isler (Sustainable Clark) & Rob Johnston (Marsh Institute)

This session will examine the plan to get to zero by looking at our current emissions, energy use patterns over time, mitigation strategy fails & wins, and our institutional realities. Trade-offs are at the heart of climate change; Clark’s Climate Action Plan is no exception.

Jefferson 320


Stephanie LarrieuxFrom contemplation to creative action / Climate change and cinema workshop

Stephanie Larrieux (V & PA)

While Hollywood has imagined the effects of climate change in film for decades, how has contemporary independent world cinema these issues?  This session includes a screening and discussion of Kenyan science fiction short film Pumzi by Wanuri Kahiu. Set in a post-apocalyptic world in which water has become a scarce commodity, this short film tells the story of a determined scientist’s quest to investigate the possibility of germinating seeds beyond the confines of her repressive environment. The workshop culminates in contemplating the status of hope and exercising creativity to brainstorm new cinematic possibilities for portraying the effects of climate change and potential solutions.

Traina Center 200


Steve McCauleyInterrogating utopian visions / Shaping sustainable communities of the future

Steve McCauley (IDCE)

As we anticipate significant changes required to achieve sustainable, climate-responsible lifestyles, we confront a number of fundamental questions about the kinds of communities we wish to create and live in, and how we wish to get there.   Through a presentation and discussion activity, this session explores four key binaries that underlie visions of sustainable communities:  Local vs. Global, Connected vs. Autarchic, Radical vs. Reformist, and Fast vs. Slow.

Lurie Conference Room (University Center)


Ellen MoyerCost-effective solutions to the climate crisis are available now – why do we delay?

Ellen Moyer (Greenvironment)

We will discuss technically feasible solutions for addressing climate change that are available today, cost us less than we are paying now, require no sacrifice, have additional beneficial side benefits, and can be implemented with the stroke of a pen. We will then discuss why they are not being implemented.

Rosenblatt Conference Room (University Center)


Gil PontiusREDD projects / Plans and controversies

Gil Pontius (Geography)

REDD (Reduce Emissions due to Deforestation and Degradation) projects aim to slow greenhouse gas emissions by slowing deforestation. Many controversies exist concerning how to implement such projects because the effectiveness of such projects is not certain and there could be unintended effects. Geographic Information Science (GIS) plays a central role in the implementation of REDD projects, and Clark University is a leader concerning the use of GIS for REDD. We will examine a case study from the Amazon and discuss various aspects of REDD.

Prouty Conference Room (Goddard Library)


Amy RichterPeople made out of goods / Understanding the American culture of abundance

Amy Richter and students (History)

Confronting climate change challenges us to the rethink our relationship to goods and consumption. But consuming less requires more than strength of will or acts of self-denial. In order to make new choices, we must understand how American culture has long celebrated goods as the building blocks of national and individual identity. Many of us still think we are what we buy. How did this come to be?

Rose Library (Strassler Center)


Jennie StephensSocial change in the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy systems

Jennie Stephens (University of Vermont)

Climate change urgency is accelerating the transition away from fossil fuels toward renewable-based energy systems. This renewable energy transition is much more than a technical substitution; this transition also involves deep social, cultural, and political change including: (1) reducing the powerful political influence of corporations profiting from fossil fuel reliance, (2) empowering individuals, households and communities to engage with local renewable energy systems, (3) diversifying the energy sector so that women and under-represented minorities are more involved in critical energy decisions, (4) divesting from fossil fuel infrastructure, and (5) changing expectations and assumptions about levels of energy consumption.  This session will explore how to anticipate, prepare for, and facilitate these changes.

Grace Conference Room (University Center)


Local activism and solutions

Michelle Wenderlich (Geography PhD student), Dania Flores (Grassroots Global Justice), Julia Tredeau (Shalefield Justice Spring Break), Holly Jones and Kyle Schulz

Please join local activists as they discuss their experiences in different climate justice related struggles around the world. We’ll be discussing forms of resistance and ideas of transformation beyond a growth-centered, anti-democratic, overworked and isolated capitalist world. We’ll have short inputs on global climate justice struggles and connections to ongoing colonization, fracking, pipeline (also local!) and extreme energy resistance, struggles for energy democracy and degrowth, and community economies.

We aim to save at least a third of the time to discuss directions and possibilities in Worcester.

Bassett Admissions Center


Chris WilliamsThe truth about climate change and pathways to a safer future

Chris Williams (Geography)

Global warming from the burning of fossil fuels is undeniable. We already feel the impacts and see them rising steeply into the future unless we take concerted action to transition to cleaner technologies. While the problem is clear and the technological solutions are ready, implementation remains wickedly elusive because of structural momentum as well as powerful economic and political forces that resist change. This session will expose the facts about climate change, challenge distortions asserted by denialists and special interests, identify key risks and vulnerabilities in the earth system, and discuss a path to a safer future.

Daniels Theatre (Atwood Hall)

SESSION FOUR

7 – 8 PM


Chuck AgostaExploring renewable energy

Chuck Agosta (Physics)

Did we start on the right track? How can we use it more effectively? One of the ways to reduce our production of greenhouse gases is to switch from using fossil fuels for our energy needs to renewable energy sources.  The power generated by photo-voltaics has more than tripled in Massachusetts in the last three years, which is a good sign.  But given the investment in this increasingly important source of energy, are we really getting the most out of it? What is renewable energy 2.0, and how do we make it happen?

Traina Center 111


Erci.jpgConversation Café: Environmental Justice

Eric DeMeulenaere (Education) and Melat Seyoum (’15)

What is environmental justice? Scientists have already concluded that their will be significant impacts from global warming and other environmental degradation. But the social scientists have taught us that these impacts will not affect everyone (every being) equally. This dialogue explores this reality by asking what is environmental injustice and environmental justice in our world.

Higgins Lounge (Dana Commons)


Rachel SheaAs within, so without / climate change and you, an indigenous wisdom approach 

Rachael Shea (Goddard Library) and Amelia Cenotti

Indigenous Elders of all traditions speak of similar “technologies” that are available to each and every one of us right now that will help our environment. We begin with relationship – relationship to self, other, the Earth, your Higher Power. “As within, so without.”  Even the language “how do we fix the climate change crisis?” suggests that the “fix” is something outside of myself. In this conversation we will explore our personal roles and actions that can begin in this moment.

Grace Conference Room (University Center)


sriniUN and multilateral action against climate change

Srini Sitaraman (Political Science) 

My focus is going to be on how/what of the UN in tackling climate change at the international level.  The focus will be in on the international politics and the complex challenges of getting a global treaty together, so collective measures could be pursued to reduce the overall carbon emissions.

Lurie Conference Room (University Center)


Gregory TrencherPossible climate change futures: The temptations of nuclear and of geoengineering

Gregory Trencher (IDCE)

In this dialogue we will discuss nuclear energy and the emerging science of geoengineering as potential “silver bullets” to sidestep dangerous climate change. Neither promoting or rejecting either technology, we will explore the merits and potential dangers of each, and then consider if either has a place in a carbon-restrained world increasingly threatened by climate change.

Traina Center 112


Walter WrightSeeing things whole: A dialogue

Walter Wright (Philosophy)

The short documentary Overview will serve as a prompt for this dialogue about climate change. After viewing the film, we will consider ways of imagining climate more comprehensively.

Fuller Conference Room (Goddard Library)

PARTICIPATING CLASSES 

Open to the public


 Jess BaneSongs for the Earth

Jessica Bane Robert (English)

The poet and artist, brave enough to feel and see it all, have throughout history brought deeper awareness and change to society and its pressing issues. In this session, we will touch on some of the selected readings for the Clark teach-in day through a brief dialogue. We will also look at a couple of poems together before venturing outside to write our own verses for the earth.  This session will afford an opportunity to slow, cultivate the awareness of the poet and to attend to the world around us with senses fully engaged, in a state of reverence and awe for that which sustains us all. For how can we create change if we are not willing to look with our full attention and to enter into an intimate relationship with the earth, its’ gifts, and inhabitants?

The culmination of our time together and our writings will be exhibited in an installation housed on the second floor of Traina in the Art Lab.

Concurring with class ENG 101: Introduction to Creative Writing.

Jonas Clark 104 (1.45-2.45)


Stephen LevinFictions of Empire

Steven Levin (English)

The class will read Paolo Bacigalupi’s novel The Windup Girl, which examines climate change and agribusiness in a speculative form, and discuss the following articles: “Dystopia and the End of Politics” by Benjamin Kunkel (2008), “Dirt Theory and Material Ecocriticsm” by Heather Sullivan, and “The Challenge of Imagining Ecological Futures: Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl” by Andrew Hageman. This unit will build on earlier reading of Abdelrahman Munif’s novel Cities of Salt, which chronicles the discovery of oil by Americans in Saudi Arabia in the 1930s and explores the relationship between modernity and the environment in earlier generation.

Concurring with class ENG 275: Fictions of Empire

BP 217 (2:50-5:50)


How Worcester and other cities are responding to climate change

Joe O’Brien (GSOM), Peggy Middaugh, Matt Feinstein & John O’Dell

This session will provide an overview of how American cities are responding to climate change, and efforts by US Conference of Mayors to make climate a priority for local government. It will include a panel discussion with Peggy Middaugh, Worcester Tree Initiative, on planting trees to address climate and community health issues; Matt Feinstein, Worcester Green Jobs Coalition, on creating jobs in energy conservation and renewable energy; and John O’Dell, City of Worcester Energy and Facilities Manager, on Worcester’s Climate Action plan and energy conservation efforts.

Jefferson 133 (1:45-2:45)


Robert TobinQueer theory and the anthropocene

Robert Tobin (Language, Literature, and Culture)

How can queer theory and gender studies help us think about the “anthropocene,” the era when the activities of human beings have had a global impact on the earth’s ecosystems?

Concurring with class GER230: The German Discovery of Sex

Estabrook 303 (2:50-5:50)


Ed WeinbergerPutting a price tag on an uncertain future / A first step in climate change mitigation

Ed Weinberger (GSOM)

While there is near unanimous agreement about the science of climate change, there is sharp disagreement within the United States about what to actually do about it. Central to that discussion is the trade-off between the costs of future harm and the immediate costs of remediation. Estimates of remediation costs vary widely, but they could exceed 2% of current U.S. GDP per year.  Estimates of the most severe costs of global warming vary even more widely. While these costs are generally believed to be incurred a few generations from now, there is some chance of more immediate costs, due to the near-term climate catastrophes described in other teach-in sessions. Thus, the cost-benefit approach that policy makers tend to apply to situations like global warming requires a present value of these costs, including the contingent costs of climate catastrophes. I will present the economic thinking behind some of the best known of these present value calculations, after which I will open the floor for discussion.

Concurring with class FIN2508: Fixed Income Securities.

Carlson Hall 120 (1:25-2:40)

EXHIBITION
All week


s200_michael_loren_siegelScreen Perspectives on Climate Change

Michael Loren Siegel (V&PA) and students

The Screen Studies program proudly presents the following eight short documentaries made for Introduction to Digital Filmmaking. Students were split into groups of two or three and given two weeks to research, shoot, and edit a 3-5 minute documentary that concerns itself with climate change in any way and from any perspective. The resulting films touch on a wide variety of issues, including global warming, environmental degradation, extreme weather, and global and local environmental initiatives, some of which are occurring right here at Clark.

Part of SCRN 107 Introduction to Digital Filmmaking.

Traina Center Second Floor Lounge

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